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  • Category Archives: Operational Transformation

    Podcast: Navigating the Current of Decentralizing Leadership in a Nuclear Sub

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    Paul Colwell, a dynamic and collaborative leader in high stress and highly technical environments, meets with Podcast host David Lee. Discussed in this podcast is Colwell’s experience as a Naval Nuclear Submarine Officer and the contrasting styles of leadership he experienced from a centralized submarine to de-centralized one. Colwell examines his direct exposure with the Navy’s decision to elevate to a Responsive, adaptive leadership environment that encourages flexibility fit for unpredictable conditions.  This shift allowed Colwell to experience the interworkings of a truly Responsive organization in the high-risk environment of a Nuclear Submarine.

    The book “Turn the Ship Around” by Captain David Marquet is discussed as well as Colwell’s personal experiences that relate to the book’s concepts. In “Turn the Ship Around” Captain David Marquet imagines a workplace where everyone engages and contributes their full intellectual capacity, a place where people are healthier and happier because they have more control over their work—a place where everyone is a leader. Colwell expands on his similar experience with the Responsive environment brought into the Naval Forces. (View https://www.davidmarquet.com/our-story/ for more.)

     

     

    Download this podcast: Navigating the Current of Decentralizing Leadership in a Nuclear Sub

     

    Podcast: Get to Know SWAE and Yuma Regional Medical Center

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    An Introduction to Baldrige with the Southwest Alliance for Excellence (SWAE)

    Southwest Alliance for Excellence (SWAE) members Carl Herring and Karen Shepard provide an in-depth introduction to the Baldrige framework of business transformation and it’s application. With the mission to empower organizations to pursue performance excellence, improve outcomes and contribute to the economic strength of their community and state, Carl and Karen discuss how Baldrige methodology holds the potential to positively alters the foundation of many organizations. The discussion was led by David William Lee of MSSBTI.

     

    Download this podcast: Introduction to Baldrige by SWAE

     


    SWAE Baldrige Implementation at Yuma Regional Medical Center

    The team of Yuma Regional Medical Center joins David William Lee in an animated discussion of the SWAE Baldrige Framework’s implementation. In the conversation is Robert Trenschel, President & Chief Executive Officer of Yuma Regional Medical Center, Deborah Aders, Chief Nursing Officer and Vice President of Patient Care Services and Woody Martin, Chairman of the Yuma Regional Medical Center. The group discusses their application of the Southwest Alliance for Excellence (SWAE) “Baldrige” Framework for the past 5 years. Discussed is the journey through the implementation process of this business transformation module. The group expands on the execution of this framework in a uniquely high risk, high expectation environment of a hospital.

     

    Download this podcast: Baldrige Implementation at Yuma Regional Medical Center

     

    Podcast: Innovative Entrepreneur Josh Hebert

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    Born and raised in Arizona, Josh Hebert, an experienced chef and restaurant management consultant, started his career at renowned restaurant Tarbell’s in central Phoenix. After five years at the well-known restaurant, Josh’s quest for food collided with culture as he traveled the world from San Francisco to Tokyo. Shortly after returning to Arizona he opened POSH on New Year’s Eve of 2008, and has since opened Hot Noodles and Cold Sake – a ramen shop in Scottsdale with Japanese-style cuisine. Josh has skillfully blended his vast restaurant experience into a career in restaurant advisory and management.

    Listen in as Josh and David Lee talk about the future of restaurants.

    * This podcast was recorded prior to the passing of Anthony Bourdain.  We honor and thank Mr. Bourdain for his outstanding contributions to culture, cuisine, and the human condition.


     

     

     

    15% of Your Operating Expenses are Vanishing Right Before Your Eyes!

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    Follow the money…

    Human Resources (HR) is typically far from a top priority for many businesses. That is until you are short on staff or need help dealing with concerning behaviors. Yes, we all need this group for recruiting, onboarding, training, and occasionally to support performance improvement initiatives, yet in many organizations these people costs are overlooked by executives. According to Forbes, many companies consider HR a “back-office function.”1 So when HR is not visible it can quickly become a cost challenge, especially with recruiting, onboarding and training (hard costs) rising annually and the inefficiencies from re-training, lost customer relationships and missing information (soft costs) typically going unnoticed.

    HR is so much more than just hiring and firing these days. The lifecycle cost associated with managing people has been labeled Human Capital Management (HCM). Studies demonstrate that the long-term impact measured from not effectively hiring, maintaining employee engagement and increasing retention can easily catapult and organization to the top or bottom of their industry.

    According to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) research, the average HCM costs for a company are 15% of operating expenses. With continuous turnover and new employee initiatives it is easily rationalized that the average of $10,211 spent on HR expenses per full time equivalent (FTE) is most likely a conservative estimate since soft costs vary by organization.2

    SHRM estimates that the fully-loaded cost of finding and replacing a new hire have averages 2 times3 the recruit’s annual salary depending on the industry. Also, according to SHRM, in 2016 there was an average annual employee turnover rate of 19%. Doing some quick math for your business, it is easy to estimate how expensive it is to replace almost 20% of your workforce annually. Especially since the cost of hiring an individual often requires the following expenses:

    1. 3rd party recruiting fees
    2. On-Boarding and job specific training
    3. Employment benefits
    4. Administrative expenses
    5. And the inefficiencies associated with the job vacancy

    According SHRM the average cost just to hire an individual is $4,129.4

    Quick Calculations for Your Organization

    Using the below formulas from SHRM you can quickly get a rough estimate on the direct cost of hiring a new employee and the fully-loaded replacement costs that employee hiring has at your business.

    Cost of Hiring

     

    It quickly becomes apparent that shaving just 10% off the sample company’s direct costs would add back $24,774 to the bottom line. And if you reduced the fully loaded replacement cost by just 10% the impact on the bottom line more than triples to $80,000. So, if a sample company can increase profitability by over $100,000 ($25,200+$80,000) by hiring and keeping about 10% more of the ‘right employees’ imagine the impact on your organization.

    Who are these ‘right employees’?

    While many leaders in an organization can easily identify their superstar employees at their company; the rest of the staff are often overlooked and without leadership and innovation become average to below-average performers. Over the years, for-profit and non-profit organizations alike have prided themselves on not downsizing or keeping their employees while still maintaining target profitability levels. Unfortunately keeping average or below average employees just isn’t a sound business solution. Each time a company decides to ignore complacent and unengaged employees, it loses significantly more revenues than it would by letting them go and replacing them with the ‘right employees’. And according to the U.S. Department of Labor, the price of a bad hire is at least 30 percent of the employee’s first-year earnings.5 This cost far outpaces earnings that the individual makes for most companies.

    How can you save at least 10% of these expenses?

    There needs to be a new method that replaces the traditional HCM model to accommodate where not just our current operating model, but align with where businesses are headed. The Future of Work is an increasingly competitive and global economy, with technological disruptors and new competition being unveiled each week. The speed of change has created an environment where companies have difficulty defining what they need now and especially not what they need out of their employees 1 to 3 years from when they are hired. Organizations that adopt principles that enable their employees to adapt to this Future of Work will be better equipped for change and stay more competitive in the marketplace.

    By focusing on employee engagement, organizations can make it easier to achieve strategic goals and objectives while being agile and responsive to new market conditions. Aligning with the Future of Work and structuring hiring and engagement strategies around today’s market will help your leadership team to better align your people strategy with the organization’s overall culture and its mission and values. Being a Responsive organization prepares you for the Future of Work aligning Human Capital Management (HCM) with the organizations vision. One example of a Responsive company that has been recognized as a leader in modeling Responsive Human Capital Management is Google.

    Case Study: Over 2.5 Million Job Applicants Each Year at Google

    Google works with its employees to hire the best people in the quickest time possible. Google receives over 2.5 million job applicants each year6 which shows how people covet the company’s working environment. To treat candidates fairly, Google has standardized their hiring process through analytics.

    Google’s People Operations team (those responsible for HCM) have restructured their hiring process based on the Schmidt and Hunter’s 1998 study on 85 years of research on how well assessments predict performance, which showed that standardized questions have the highest correlation to job performance other than work sample tests. 7

    Google combines behavioral and situational structured interviews with assessments of cognitive ability, conscientiousness, and leadership. Google aids its interviewers by using an internal tool called qDroid, where an interviewer picks the job they are screening for, checks the attributes they want to test, and is emailed an interview guide with questions designed to predict performance for that job. Interviewers can also share the document with others on the interview panel, so everyone can collaborate to assess the candidate from all perspectives.8
    According to Business Insider, Google takes an average of six weeks to secure a hire, and every candidate needs to be screened by their potential boss, potential colleagues, and a hiring committee.9 Google uses the following principles in the hiring process:

    1. Only hire people better than you
    2. Employees need references from Google employees
    3. Make the process objective, comprehensive and unbiased
    4. Give them a reason to be there and to stay

    In addition to being meticulous in the hiring process, Google leadership has embraced creating their own organization specific attributes that align with their culture. One example is identifying if a candidate has ‘Googleyness’. Googleyness is defined by Lazlo Bock, head of people operations at Google, as…

    “Attributes like enjoying fun (who doesn’t), a certain dose of intellectual humility (it’s hard to learn if you can’t admit that you might be wrong), a strong measure of conscientiousness (we want owners, not employees), comfort with ambiguity (we don’t know how our business will evolve, and navigating Google internally requires dealing with a lot of ambiguity), and evidence that you’ve taken some courageous or interesting paths in your life.”

    Following the above principles and fully embracing the company culture, Google’s recruiting time has been slashed from taking 10 hours of a manager’s time each week to 1.5 hours each week.10

    Examples of Google’s standard hire interview questions:

    1. Tell me about a time your behavior had a positive impact on your team. Follow-ups:
      • What was your primary goal and why?
      • How did your teammates respond?
      • Moving forward, what’s your plan?
    2. Tell me about a time when you effectively managed your team to achieve a goal. What did your approach look like? Follow-ups:
      • What were your targets and how did you meet them as an individual and as a team?
      • How did you adapt your leadership approach to different individuals?
      • What was the key takeaway from this specific situation?
    3. Tell me about a time you had difficulty working with someone (can be a coworker, classmate, client). What made this person difficult to work with for you? Follow-ups:
      • What steps did you take to resolve the problem?
      • What was the outcome?
      • What could you have done differently?

    The questions give Google interviewers a consistent, reliable basis for sifting the superb candidates from the merely great. Superb candidates will have a lot better examples and reasons for making the choices they did. Lazlo Bock, Senior Vice President of People Operations at Google, explained the following in his book, Work Rules!:

    “For example, imagine you’re interviewing someone for a tech-support job. A solid answer for “identifies solutions” would be, “I fixed the laptop battery like my customer asked.” An outstanding answer would be, “I figured that since he had complained about battery life in the past and was about to go on a trip, I’d also get a spare battery in case he needed it.” Applying a boring- seeming rubric is the key to quantifying and taming the mess.”11

    Google’s version of the scoring for general cognitive ability has five components, starting with how well the candidate understands the problem. For each component, the interviewer has to indicate how the candidate did, and each performance level is clearly defined. The interviewer then has to write exactly how the candidate demonstrated their general cognitive ability, so later reviewers can make their own assessment.12  Bock continues,

    “A concise hiring rubric addresses all these issues because it distills messy, vague, and complicated work situations down to measurable, comparable results. Overall, fight for quality.”13

    Responsive Organizations Excel at HCM

    Google is a Responsive company that fights for quality in every aspect of their business, especially within their “People Operations.” Responsive companies use HCM to deliver the best solutions for employee needs, cutting down on time and resources for hiring, and then hire well. By working with leaders in the organization, front-line managers, and human resource personnel, Responsive organizations partner with HCM to take a holistic approach to restructuring hiring by assessing candidates based on performance information directly correlated to how successful they would ultimately be when they are hired. Based on statistics, Responsive organizations provide a sustainable and long-term solution for employee needs. By finding the right solution for identifying truly qualified hires, creating a strong sense of purpose, and challenging the status quo, Responsive organizations use HCM to foster impactful change within every organization.

    To learn more about Responsive visit http://responsive.org and to get involved locally find us at http://responsiveorgphx.org.

    MSS works with companies to manage their human capital management and deliver effective organizational changes. If you are interested in learning more, email David Lee at dlee@mssbti.com.


    ¹ https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbeshumanresourcescouncil/2017/08/09/why-every-ceo-should-give-hr-a-seat-at-the-table/2/#3afe9a7c61f0

    ² https://www.shrm.org/hr-today/trends-and-forecasting/research-and-surveys/Documents/2016-Human-Capital-Report.pdf
    ³ Allen, D. (2008). Retaining Talent. Retrieved August 17, 2017 from https://www.shrm.org/hr-today/trends-and-forecasting/special-reports-and-expert-views/Documents/Retaining-Talent.pdf
    4 https://www.shrm.org/about-shrm/press-room/press-releases/pages/human-capital-benchmarking-report.aspx
    5 http://www.humanresourcesiq.com/hr-talent-aquisition/articles/what-s-the-real-cost-of-a-bad-hire
    6 Bullygo, Z. (2013). Inside Google’s Culture of Success and Employee Happiness. Retrieved August 21, 2017 from https://blog.kissmetrics.com/googles-culture-of-success/
    7 Schmidt, F. L., & Hunter, J. E. (1998). The validity and utility of selection methods in personnel psychology: Practical and theoretical implications of 85 years of research findings. Psychological bulletin, 124(2), 262.
    8 Bock, L. (2015). Here’s Google’s Secret To Hiring The Best People. WIRED. Retrieved August 21, 2017 from https://www.wired.com/2015/04/hire-like-google/
    9 Feloni, R. (2016). Google’s HR boss explains the company’s 4 rules for hiring the best employees. Retrieved August 21, 2017 from http://www.businessinsider.com/how-google-hires-exceptional-employees-2016-2
    10 Feloni, R. (2016). Google’s HR boss explains the company’s 4 rules for hiring the best employees. Retrieved August 21, 2017 from http://www.businessinsider.com/how-google-hires-exceptional-employees-2016-2
    11 Bock, L. (2015). Work rules!: Insights from inside Google that will transform how you live and lead. Hachette UK.
    12 Bock, L. (2015). Here’s Google’s Secret To Hiring The Best People. WIRED. Retrieved August 21, 2017 from https://www.wired.com/2015/04/hire-like-google/
    13 Bock, L. (2015). Work rules!: Insights from inside Google that will transform how you live and lead. Hachette UK.

    Management Consultant, MSS Business Transformation Advisory

    Shawn is a management consultant with over twenty years’ experience integrating strategy, leadership development, process, accounting & finance, and technology initiatives across a variety of industries across the globe. He successfully delivers technology and change management solutions utilizing his background and training as CPA, MBA (Finance) and Masters in Project Management. MSSBTA

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    Non-observant People Create Risk | MSSBTI

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    People can be categorized in one of two ways – observant or non-observant. According to Dr. Dean Kashiwagi, it is non-observant people that cause risk and inefficiency in an organization by not looking at their surroundings to understand what they should. They collect too much data to help make decisions, thus creating risk in their organization. So, how do you minimize risk created by non-observant people?

    In this podcast, Dr. Kashiwagi and David Lee discuss and debate this unique and controversial perspective.

     


    Dean T. Kashiwagi, PhD, PE

    IFMA Fellow, Director, Professor, Professional Engineer

    Dr. Kashiwagi is the Director of Kashiwagi Solution Model Inc., a worldwide leader in improving facility/project performance and efficiency. Dr. Kashiwagi has developed a “hands off” approach to managing contractors or vendors in any industry. His concept is contrary to traditional price-driven procurement. The technology has been tested 1800+ times totaling $6.6 Billion ($4.4 Billion in construction projects and $2.2B in non-construction projects) with a 98% success rate since 1994 in 7 different countries and 32 states.

    Professor Kashiwagi is the author of the Information Measurement Theory (IMT) and the Best Value Approach (BVA). He was the recipient of a Fulbright Scholar Award in 2008 through which he is took the PIPS management technology to the University of Botswana in Africa and helped transform a “research based” graduate program in project management. His work is also being tested in the Netherlands (on a $1.3B infrastructure project) and in Malaysia.

    Prior to joining KSM Inc., Dr. Dean was the director of the Performance Based Studies Research Group, a professor at Arizona State University, Design/Project Engineer, Project Manager, Educator, and Researcher for the US Air Force during his 14-year tour.  KSM Inc.

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    MSSBTI Certified Prosci Change Management Practitioner

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    Participants will be equipped with Prosci’s research-based change management methodology and tools including the Prosci 3-Phase Process, Prosci® ADKAR® Model, Change Management Toolkit, and Change Management Pilot Professional in order to develop scaled change management strategies for projects and initiatives. Participants who successfully complete the program will be certified as a Prosci Change Management Practitioner.

    Program Length

    Intended Audience

    Employees who are responsible for managing change on specific projects or initiatives or those responsible for building an organizational change management competency. This could include:

    • Change Managers
    • change management team members
    • Project Managers
    • project team members
    • HR leads
    • OD leads
    • sponsors of change
    • consultants and trainers

    Ideal Size

    Success Factors

    • Effective sponsorship
    • Administrative support
    • Project and work group definitions
    • Managing expectations
    • Environment
    • Pre-work completion

     

    For more information about becoming a Certified Prosci Change Management Practitioner, contact us at 602-387-2100 or dlee@mssbti.com.  Workshop can be performed at MSSBTI facilities in Central Phoenix, AZ or onsite at the client location.

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    MSSBTI Quantum Negotiation Training and Certification

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    Quantum Negotiation™ taught by Karen S. Walch, PhD

    High performance and buoyancy in negotiation are at the core of all leadership roles. The Quantum Negotiation™ preparation framework explores who we are as negotiators in the context of our social conditioning. This program is designed to discover, accelerate, and transform leadership capacity about HOW to communicate, collaborate, negotiate, and innovate under disruption and uncertainty.

    Karen S. Walch, PhD, is an emeritus faculty at Thunderbird School of Global Management, an Executive Educator, and Co-Creator of Quantum Negotiation™. She is a consultant and coach who specializes in negotiation, collaboration, influence, and inclusive leadership.

    The Quantum Negotiation practice and coaching framework explores all human dimensions in the cognitive, psychological, social, physical, and spiritual fields. Quantum Leaders have a strong sense of self, identity, and are anchored to their own values AND buoyant in their behavior.

    This is a highly interactive, possibly personal impact course and includes an optional 5 hours of post training follow-up to assure participants are successfully integrating presented materials and experiences that took place during demonstrations and interactions with other participants.

    To learn more about the Quantum Negotiation workshop, contact MSSBTI at 602-387-2100 or dlee@mssbti.com.


    Program Audience

    • Enterprise leaders and their teams
    • Teams in transitions
    • Intermediate level negotiators, facilitators and HR experts
    • Crisis and first response professionals

    Length

    • Pre-workshop one-on-one interviews to assess developmental level and identity personal objectives (about 15-30 minutes per participant)
    • 2-day workshop
    • 5 hours private coaching follow up for supporting and debriefing behavioral change

    Expected Outcomes

    • Shortened time to establish and implement shared enterprise/team vision and strategy
    • Accelerated budget and resource allocation across all functions
    • Increased satisfaction of tolerance and cultural transformation
    • Transformation in employee engagement and inclusive behaviors
    • Accelerated transformation of leader and team dynamics from resistance to engagement
    • Create action plans for collaboration and innovation

    Benefits

    • Increased understanding of the complexity of negotiation as a dynamic process that affects all aspects of one’s life and professional performance
    • Improved ability to apply the new knowledge of how others think, feel and behave when there are gaps in social engagement/mapping
    • Applied deeper level of self and other awareness to improve interaction and negotiation difficulties
    • Increased confidence and sense of powerful engagement through a more complete understanding of the interests and concerns of all stakeholders
    • Ability to style shift while maintaining own identity and values
    • Actionable Plan to optimize real time leadership challenges in employee and team interactions

    Location

    • All workshops can be performed at MSSBTI facilities in Central Phoenix, AZ or onsite at the client location

    See all workshops offered through MSSBTI

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    MSSBTI Program for Managers and Supervisors

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    This program gives managers and supervisors the tools and skills necessary for understanding and processing change themselves and then successfully leading their teams through change. Using the Prosci Change Management Process for Managers and Supervisors and accompanying toolkit, managers will evaluate changes that are happening in their organization and the impacts changes will have on them and their teams. With this understanding, managers will learn to use the Prosci ADKAR® Model to assess their team and create action plans to lead their teams through current and future changes.

    Program Length

    Intended Audience

    • Managers and supervisors with direct reports

    Ideal size

    Success Factors

    • Sponsorship
    • Completed pre-work
    • Managed Expectations

    For more about the Program for Managers, contact us at 602-387-2100 or dlee@mssbti.com. Workshop can be performed at MSSBTI facilities in Central Phoenix, AZ or onsite at the client location.

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    Business Transformation Kickstart for Leadership

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    ASAP™ Business Transformation Kickstart for Leadership

    This program is a multi-tiered leadership development program designed for senior executives who are leading, or preparing to lead, large transformational efforts in their organizations. It focuses on the specific approaches, actions, and behaviors that leaders and their teams need to lead successful transformation.

    The Business Transformation Kickstart for Leadership program introduces concepts from top leadership development and Change Management training programs and utilizes leading edge tools for identifying challenges and developing a plan to achieve high performing, adaptive, collaborative and well prepared transformational leaders.

    For more detailed information about Business Transformation Kickstart for Leadership training, contact David Lee, MSSBTI Executive Director, at 602-387-2128 or dlee@mssbti.com.


    Program Audience

    • This program is perfect for organizations that are preparing for or are in the early stages of transformation and need to raise their leadership performance and/or are experiencing a deficiency in the leadership collaboration and communication.

    Type of Program

    • Customizable program delivered in modules for individual, self-directed learning that introduces leadership concepts and approaches
    • Includes a 1-day facilitated program with team members
    • Includes online learning module

    Length

    • 2-day facilitated workshop
    • 3 to 4 hours online module
    • Ongoing tracking of team development and follow up for 6 months following facilitation

    Expected Outcomes

    • A comprehensive understanding of transformational leadership concepts
    • Learning and application of leadership techniques for driving organizational change
    • An ability to lead transformation at multiple level of the organization
    • Recognize and lead sustainable change
    • Develop and implement a unified transformational vision
    • Identify and reduce risks of transformational change initiatives

    Benefits

    • Accelerates transformation by developing high performing transformational leadership team
    • Rapidly mitigates risk of change by creating awareness of transformational needs and challenges and building capabilities for managing them
    • Creates visual representation of the current and desired future state of the leadership with an immediately actionable roadmap at the group and individual level
    • Produces a trackable plan for achieving the future state of high performance
    • Eliminates siloes and builds awareness of leadership capabilities, strengths and weaknesses
    • Increases adaptability of leaders and their teams to prepare for disruptive transformation

    Applications

    • Transformational leadership development
    • High performance improvement planning
    • Improving collaboration and communication
    • Managing enterprise level change

    Location

    • This program can be conducted at MSSBTI facilities in Central Phoenix, AZ or onsite at the client’s location
    • Follow ups are flexible to be onsite
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    The turn around of Goodwill of Central and Northern Arizona

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    With nearly three decades of experience working in the thrift industry, Tim O’Neal has spent the past 18 years focused on the mission of fighting unemployment in the state of Arizona. When O’Neal was brought on with Goodwill of Central Arizona, the organization was in serious financial trouble and at risk of having its membership removed by Goodwill Industries International.

    O’Neal’s arrival marked a turning point in the 70-year history of the organization, and his leadership was instrumental in keeping the organization running by increasing retail operations by 3000 percent during his tenure as the Vice President of Retail Operations

    During this Podcast, we discuss the transformation and growth of Goodwill of Arizona into one of the top 3 Goodwill organizations in the world.

    If you would like a tour of Goodwill of Central and Northern Arizona’s facilities contact Tim at tim.oneal@goodwillaz.org.

     

     

     

     

    MSS Business Transformation Advisory is a leading provider of business transformation solutions focusing on strategic, operational, organizational, and digital transformation through our strategic advisory services, and educational offerings and thought leadership platforms. MSSBTA.com

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