Apply to MSS

First Name

Last Name

Phone

Email

State

Education

Check all that apply

Experience with a major consulting firm

Check all that apply

Certifications

Check all that apply

Experience

Check all that apply

Functional Experience

Check all that apply

Attach Cover Letter

Attach Resume

Join Our Talent Community

First Name

Last Name

Phone

Email

State

Education

Check all that apply

Experience with a major consulting firm

Check all that apply

Certifications

Check all that apply

Experience

Check all that apply

Functional Experience

Check all that apply

Attach Resume

facebook gplus linkedin sharethis

Category Archives: Uncategorized

Could ERP Efficiencies Be Hiding In Plain Sight?

Many organizations implementing ERP drive hard to go-live, but once the system is up and running they fail to optimize for the changing business environment. Where they could utilize efficiencies within the system, they are ultimately leaving money on the table.

Some common hidden efficiencies that are missed include:

  • Automated bank transactions warehouse
  • Automated inter-company sales
  • Budget checking on PO’s (tightly controlled encumbrance process for grant tracking)
  • Landed cost linked to inventory through manufacturing to get true costing
  • Automated cash receipts / lockbox processing

In addition to the above, consider if your organization is making the most of the functionality available in the modules you own. For example, in the Purchasing module, are Approvals being utilized fully and successfully? Are Purchase Requisitions and/or Purchase Quotes used most efficiently?




In an earlier email message 8 Differences Between a Common ERP Approach and an Optimized One we discussed the example of a user interface that hadn’t changed since the initial implementation. As a result, it looked “old school” and didn’t offer the experience users were used to with other systems. By simply implementing other available versions of screens for ease-of-use, they could have easily changed processing options or data selections making data entry faster and easier, thereby increasing productivity.

By uncovering efficiencies already available in your ERP system your organization could be just steps away from realizing company-wide benefits that optimization brings and avoid leaving money on the table.

MSS can help uncover and implement new hidden efficiencies by:

  • Meeting with your JDE end users to identify usage and/or training gaps
  • Assessing your JDE environment with a focus on improving efficiencies via setup/ technology/reporting
  • Providing JDE documentation comparing your current system to the latest releases of the application

 

Mature Innovation

My family can tell you that I consider myself one of the great armchair innovators. Among the many things I believe I invented before they were actually invented is the Keurig coffee dispenser, Netflix (streaming AND original content), and the Amazing Race. The problem I always told myself was that I never had access to the resources required to put my ideas into the market. So when I secured a position managing innovation at a global mega-company, I was excited. Here, I would finally have the opportunity to launch my great ideas, become massively famous, and change the world. Boy, did I have a lot to learn.

What soon became clear was that managing innovation for a mega-organization is not about creating great ideas. Of course we had our chance to develop some ideas, but mostly our role was to capture the ideas of leadership, cut through the noise, politics, and disruptions, and push them forward.

Read the full article

5 Things I Wish My COO Knew About Our Supply Chain

Operating in a Global Economy is not for the weak.  Organizations need to be fit.  Fit for the sprints.  Fit for the marathons.  Fit for the heavy lifting that comes with a perfectly primed pipeline of raw materials from strategic sources, WIP between plants and finished goods ready for customer demand.

If the next natural disaster, port closure and UPS strike all happen next week and you are ready, then read no further, you are a Supply Chain Rock Star.  But…even without any of these disruptions, the complexity of today’s supply chain is evident and challenging in every transaction from purchasing, inventory management, planning, production all the way through logistics and transportation.

Keep reading

5 Things I Wish My COO Knew (and told me!) About Our Supply Chain

Eileen Madden Mitchell, Management Consultant for MSS Business Transformation Advisory and Supply Chain expert, talks about what she believes every COO needs to know about effective Supply Chain Management. Mitchell states that in a global economy, organizations need to be fit for the heavy lifting that comes with a perfectly primed pipeline of raw materials from strategic sources, WIP between plants and finished goods ready for customer demand. Mitchell speaks about the ever-changing economy and some of the disruptors and how to be prepared with her best practices. They are the basis of creating a sustainable supply chain, an adaptive business model, and corporate phenomenon. Click here to read more.

9 Truths for Achieving Change through JDE ERP Implementation

Post ERP implementation blues are problematic for a number of reasons not the least of which is the decline of the collaborative and empowered culture that the implementation tends to create. A common cause for JDE ERP sub-optimization is that most companies do not plan sufficiently to sustain the culture required to achieve the full benefits if the system. While leaders often consider the need for ongoing technology development and maintenance, it is just as important that they plan for cultural sustainability.

Generally, leaders will make a false assumption that an ERP implementation will be plug-and- play, that performance will come naturally, and that the culture will adapt as a result of the technology. But the research is clear. Having a great company culture is no longer optional for companies who want to compete.


“If you ask a group of CIOs what their biggest barrier to change is in their organization or indeed the wider enterprise, the most common response is almost always culture or some variant thereof. In the 2018 CIO Survey, 46% of respondents named culture as the biggest barrier to scaling digital transformation. This answer isn’t surprising. But it’s also not very useful, since culture is amorphous — hard to pin down, hard to change.”
– Gartner, The Art of Culture Hacking

ERP is the backbone of an organization’s operational structure, and exists to improve information flow, reduce costs, optimize processes, link with suppliers, and reduce response times. But, to accomplish all of this, it is must also help break down silos, enable transparency, and ensure better cooperation. In other words, the ultimate result of a successful JDE ERP is empowered employees and a collaborative culture. ERP implementation is just part of the complex journey. Organizations often underestimate just how much cultural heavy lifting is required to make sure the business benefits are realized post-implementation.

The good news is that a JDE ERP refresh presents a perfect opportunity to enact real cultural transformation as well. To renew and sustain the value and achieve the benefits of your JDE ERP, we adhere to 9 tenants of ERP cultural transformation:

  1. Develop a shared vision of the desired outcomes across all units.
  2. Hinge all decisions, roadmaps, and plans on achieving the business outcomes and realizing the business strategy.
  3. Make breaking down functional silos a primary goal for the program.
  4. Make development and sustainability of the culture part of the ERP strategy from the beginning.
  5. Take a top-down, holistic approach to designing and improving business processes through the system.
  6. Appoint a business lead as the executive sponsor and treat the implementation as a long-term business transformation initiative.
  7. Create a cross functional program sponsorship structure with the task of driving organizational change.
  8. Implement a robust, structured change management process that focuses on individual change at all levels.
  9. Facilitate candid, open discussions and clarity regarding cross organizational dependencies.

Download a PDF of 9 Tenets for Achieving Change through JDE ERP Implementation

 

At MSS, we work with our customers to develop a transformation plan for their JDE ERP implementation. The plan will include a shared vision, a leadership roadmap and a sponsorship coalition, a cultural implementation plan, a cross functional change strategy, and a robust sustainability plan. All of these tenets ensure a result that is more than the sum of its parts, delivering high value for your transformation.

 

Podcast: Navigating the Current of Decentralizing Leadership in a Nuclear Sub

mss-podcast

Paul Colwell, a dynamic and collaborative leader in high stress and highly technical environments, meets with Podcast host David Lee. Discussed in this podcast is Colwell’s experience as a Naval Nuclear Submarine Officer and the contrasting styles of leadership he experienced from a centralized submarine to de-centralized one. Colwell examines his direct exposure with the Navy’s decision to elevate to a Responsive, adaptive leadership environment that encourages flexibility fit for unpredictable conditions.  This shift allowed Colwell to experience the interworkings of a truly Responsive organization in the high-risk environment of a Nuclear Submarine.

The book “Turn the Ship Around” by Captain David Marquet is discussed as well as Colwell’s personal experiences that relate to the book’s concepts. In “Turn the Ship Around” Captain David Marquet imagines a workplace where everyone engages and contributes their full intellectual capacity, a place where people are healthier and happier because they have more control over their work—a place where everyone is a leader. Colwell expands on his similar experience with the Responsive environment brought into the Naval Forces. (View https://www.davidmarquet.com/our-story/ for more.)

 

 

Download this podcast: Navigating the Current of Decentralizing Leadership in a Nuclear Sub

 

4 Radically Practical Strategies to Elicit Commitment & Accountability in Today’s Climate of Change and Disruption

It is challenging to get people’s attention in this age of information overload. If the title of this article got your attention, it probably means you are experiencing the turbulent environment of overwhelm and change that many companies of all sizes are experiencing today. Do you ever feel like you are experiencing Class III, IV or V waves and you are paddling fast and hard to get through them on what you hope to be your sturdy river raft?

In the midst of the whitewater, it feels like the only way to survive is to release your raw adrenaline to produce superman’s (or woman’s) strength. But what is needed to survive (or better yet, to thrive) in the whitewater climate we are experiencing in business today is calm command of your mental, physical and emotional intelligence. Adrenaline might be sufficient when the rapids are few and far between and distanced by long smooth stretches where it is safe to be on cruise control. But in today’s business climate, whitewater is the norm and the calm waters are rare.

Today’s “whitewater” includes technology that allows us to be on 24/7, technology that can do some of the work better than people, globalization which means business opportunities and threats can come from anywhere, new generational influences entering the workforce, and on and on. It is also the disruption that constantly changes our business models, our strategies and our world as we know it. Some of the more popular examples of business “disruption” include Netflix disrupting the video rental world, Amazon disrupting the retail world, and streaming technology disrupting the music world.

For companies to thrive in our current business climate, operating from and with true commitment and accountability is the road to success. Sounds easy, but as you already know, even with the best of intentions, it is not easy to achieve. If it were, we would be making our commitments 95% of the time. Are you achieving that standard? Personally? Professionally? As an organization or team?

Most of us have very good intentions when we take on commitments or when we assign people work. We don’t intend to take on more than we could possibly do or give people more than we know they can handle (with a little stretch). But there are customers to please, deadlines to meet, new products to develop, etc., etc., etc. What is a leader to do in this untenable situation?!

Everyone knows that true commitment and accountability does not come from back to back meetings, piled on tasks and shallow commitments. But good intentions and the same old approach lead to the same old results. True commitment and accountability comes from implementing strategies that take into account that we are not just heads walking around on stick figure bodies. We cannot just analyze our way to success. True commitment and accountability comes from the realization that we are human beings with heads, hearts and bodies and that to thrive in business today, we need strategies that encompass all of these. So we are inviting leaders to engage your heads, hearts and bodies by first putting your oxygen masks on, breathing deeply and doing what it takes to operate from commitment and accountability yourselves. Then invite your employees to join you in creating this culture. We propose that you start with these four radically practical strategies:

Strategy 1: Focus on What Matters
In this day and age, we are pulled in so many directions that it seems that everything matters. However, “the everything matters” strategy will not lead to a culture of commitment and accountability. What will lead you there is determining what really does matter…to you and then to your employees.

If employees engage their hearts in their work (not just their heads) then they will be able to make strong commitments and be willing to hold themselves and others accountable. Leaders who have tied their work to their purpose, what they truly care about, tend to be inspirational leaders. If you are coming from that authentic place, it will be easier for you to help others come from that place as well. Have you ever said to yourself that you are going to do something (e.g., start working out, eating better, leaving work at a decent hour, write that article or book, etc.) and you really thought you were committed, but day in and day out you didn’t do it. Unfortunately actions speak louder than words and as it turned out, you were not truly committed. Whatever you commit to must be tied to something you truly care about or you will keep prioritizing other things. We’re sure you have noticed the difference between an employee with whom their work is tied to what they care about (e.g., learning and growth, achievement and responsibility, changing the world in a valuable way, etc.) versus the employee who is not engaged and is watching the clock and there for their paycheck. External performance is ultimately a reflection of internal commitment.

Strategy 2: Focus on Energy
This strategy seems simple enough, but in reality most of us don’t follow it. Instead we often work until we are ready to drop, fitting in one more meeting or to-do into our already full day. We don’t have time for exercise or healthy meals, but amazingly we do have time for the impromptu meetings that occur or the extra request that landed on our already full plate. We work with many leaders that are double or triple- booked in meetings, and have more on their plates than one could do even if they didn’t sleep. Which by the way is getting less and less of our time, even with the realization of how important it is to our health and our wellbeing.

Some of us use substances to keep us going – caffeine, sugar, or other substances that we think will keep us going full speed ahead. In reality, they cause us to crash and burn or at minimum lose stamina after an initial uptick in energy. And our commitments suffer because we just don’t have the energy to deal with “that” person or the creative juices to do “that” thing or the focus to truly engage the brainpower we need. Or we just run out of steam and can’t complete all of the commitments on our plate. This strategy consists of developing a “Fitness Protection Program” that will ensure your energy does not get depleted and will result in resilience, stamina and the ability to energize others. It does take some discipline to focus on our mental, physical and emotional energy, but once you do, you will find your ability to make strong commitments and meet them shows up stronger than ever.

Strategy 3: Focus on Adaptability
In our global, competitive, and disruptive world we can no longer count on old predictable ways of doing things or tried and true solutions. We need to get very comfortable with uncertainty and ambiguity. We need to take (well calculated) risks and we need to think out-of–the-box more than ever. In other words, we need to be fast, focused and flexible – which means teams and team members can adapt quickly to what is coming their way.

New information is coming at us all of the time, and we often have to change how we are going to meet a particular commitment to our internal or external customer. In order to operate in an uncertain or ambiguous environment, we have to discern between what we really know and what we don’t know. In uncertainty, it is easy to get distracted and unfocused. Instead, we need to put our attention on what really matters and not get constantly sidetracked by the seemingly urgent but not important.

And we have to be able to trust and use our intuitive intelligence, which takes ongoing practice. The practical application of intuitive intelligence allows us to discover new ideas, imaginative solutions and sometimes never before considered options to guide us toward success. Our intuition empowers us to be agile and effective in every situation we encounter. Focusing on adaptability is about taking on the practices that will allow you and your organization to thrive in uncertainty and change and will enable you to greatly enhance your culture of commitment and accountability.

Strategy 4: Focus on Conversations

“Organizations are linguistic structures built out of words and maintained by conversations. Even problems that aren’t strictly “communicational” – failures of mechanical systems for example – can be explained in terms of things said and not said, questions asked and not asked, conversations never begun or left uncompleted, alternate explanations not discussed.”

This is a quote by Walter Truett Anderson, a political scientist, social psychologist and author. This final strategy that Anderson points to so well in the quote above is a focus on conversations. This is where so many of our breakdowns around commitment and accountability occur in organizations. When we have effective conversations, we are present and utilizing our head, hearts and bodies. Having effective commitment conversations include making effective requests, providing only valid responses, aligning on expectations or conditions of satisfaction, and acknowledging the completion of a commitment or providing an early warning. Again, all of this seems so straightforward, however, we see numerous ineffective requests made and invalid responses given in organizations today (e.g., requests made in emails with no valid response given). We see very few early warnings provided but instead people are hoping their missed commitments won’t be noticed. And, we often observe the other components of a commitment conversation missing as well. Seemingly little things can lead to large breakdowns.

And when a breakdown in commitment does happen, accountability conversations are required and are even more rare in organizations. There are two types of accountability conversations needed: Responsible Complaints that are held one-on one, and Breakdown Conversations that are simple and to the point and held in team or staff meetings. Both of these conversations, when held effectively and consistently by leaders and team members, are culture changing.

When you bring all four of these strategies together as a leader, you will be well on your way to creating a culture of commitment and accountability utilizing a holistic approach – engaging yours and your team members heads, hearts and bodies. These strategies will serve as your “paddles” to guide you through the whitewater of change and disruption. If you are interested in thriving as an organization versus just surviving and interested in finding out more about how to effectively implement these strategies: focusing on what matters, focusing on energy, focusing on adaptability and focusing on key conversations, we at Ensemble would love to partner with you to implement these strategies in your leadership team and throughout your organization.

 

Podcast: Get to Know SWAE and Yuma Regional Medical Center

mss-podcast

An Introduction to Baldrige with the Southwest Alliance for Excellence (SWAE)

Southwest Alliance for Excellence (SWAE) members Carl Herring and Karen Shepard provide an in-depth introduction to the Baldrige framework of business transformation and it’s application. With the mission to empower organizations to pursue performance excellence, improve outcomes and contribute to the economic strength of their community and state, Carl and Karen discuss how Baldrige methodology holds the potential to positively alters the foundation of many organizations. The discussion was led by David William Lee of MSSBTI.

 

Download this podcast: Introduction to Baldrige by SWAE

 


SWAE Baldrige Implementation at Yuma Regional Medical Center

The team of Yuma Regional Medical Center joins David William Lee in an animated discussion of the SWAE Baldrige Framework’s implementation. In the conversation is Robert Trenschel, President & Chief Executive Officer of Yuma Regional Medical Center, Deborah Aders, Chief Nursing Officer and Vice President of Patient Care Services and Woody Martin, Chairman of the Yuma Regional Medical Center. The group discusses their application of the Southwest Alliance for Excellence (SWAE) “Baldrige” Framework for the past 5 years. Discussed is the journey through the implementation process of this business transformation module. The group expands on the execution of this framework in a uniquely high risk, high expectation environment of a hospital.

 

Download this podcast: Baldrige Implementation at Yuma Regional Medical Center

 

Podcast: Innovative Entrepreneur Josh Hebert

mss-podcast

Born and raised in Arizona, Josh Hebert, an experienced chef and restaurant management consultant, started his career at renowned restaurant Tarbell’s in central Phoenix. After five years at the well-known restaurant, Josh’s quest for food collided with culture as he traveled the world from San Francisco to Tokyo. Shortly after returning to Arizona he opened POSH on New Year’s Eve of 2008, and has since opened Hot Noodles and Cold Sake – a ramen shop in Scottsdale with Japanese-style cuisine. Josh has skillfully blended his vast restaurant experience into a career in restaurant advisory and management.

Listen in as Josh and David Lee talk about the future of restaurants.

* This podcast was recorded prior to the passing of Anthony Bourdain.  We honor and thank Mr. Bourdain for his outstanding contributions to culture, cuisine, and the human condition.


 

 

 

Non-observant People Create Risk | MSSBTI

[ad_1]

People can be categorized in one of two ways – observant or non-observant. According to Dr. Dean Kashiwagi, it is non-observant people that cause risk and inefficiency in an organization by not looking at their surroundings to understand what they should. They collect too much data to help make decisions, thus creating risk in their organization. So, how do you minimize risk created by non-observant people?

In this podcast, Dr. Kashiwagi and David Lee discuss and debate this unique and controversial perspective.

 


Dean T. Kashiwagi, PhD, PE

IFMA Fellow, Director, Professor, Professional Engineer

Dr. Kashiwagi is the Director of Kashiwagi Solution Model Inc., a worldwide leader in improving facility/project performance and efficiency. Dr. Kashiwagi has developed a “hands off” approach to managing contractors or vendors in any industry. His concept is contrary to traditional price-driven procurement. The technology has been tested 1800+ times totaling $6.6 Billion ($4.4 Billion in construction projects and $2.2B in non-construction projects) with a 98% success rate since 1994 in 7 different countries and 32 states.

Professor Kashiwagi is the author of the Information Measurement Theory (IMT) and the Best Value Approach (BVA). He was the recipient of a Fulbright Scholar Award in 2008 through which he is took the PIPS management technology to the University of Botswana in Africa and helped transform a “research based” graduate program in project management. His work is also being tested in the Netherlands (on a $1.3B infrastructure project) and in Malaysia.

Prior to joining KSM Inc., Dr. Dean was the director of the Performance Based Studies Research Group, a professor at Arizona State University, Design/Project Engineer, Project Manager, Educator, and Researcher for the US Air Force during his 14-year tour.  KSM Inc.

[ad_2]
Source link